Jarter Jargon

Posts Tagged ‘instagram

As everyone knows, Instagram launched its new video feature. What followed was not surprising. Vine fanatics bashed it, techies discussed whether it was better than Vine, and people everywhere posted the obligatory “My first Instagram video!”

While some believed the new Instagram features “beat” Vine, others argue that the two platforms are incomparable. Personally, I agree with the latter. While it’s obvious Facebook realized the potential Vine unlocked, Instagram’s video capability is very different than Vine’s.

The allure of Vine for marketers and Vine-celebs is the stop motion effect. Instagram video has a much harder time capturing that. It also takes quite a bit of creativity to pull off an impressive Vine.

Conversely, Instagram video has a few things going its way. Instagram is already so well-liked, I personally think the new feature will be widely accepted and make its way into your regular app use easier than it was for Vine to break through.

While I see Vine-celebs sticking to their guns, I think Instagram video will be a staple for consistent users.

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First we saw the rollout of Facebook hashtags. Now there are rumblings of a possible Vine-like feature to be added to Instagram.

While Facebook hashtags are a genius way of creating deeper conversations much like on Twitter, the announcement of the new Instagram feature just makes it seem as though Facebook realized how big of a hit Vine has become and wants in on the action.

Vine has become the new arena for viral sensations. 6 seconds might not seem too long, but some new creative personalities seem to have figured it out.

Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey was reportedly heartbroken when Facebook purchased Instagram in April 2012 for $1 billion in cash and stock. Looks like the joke is now on Facebook as they begin to emulate the booming Vine app feature.

Updates and developments should be interesting. Obviously, Twitter can’t own the ‘#’ symbol, but I find it interesting the use of the hashtag to create and track conversations is wide open for Facebook to swoop in and utilize (similarly, the 6-second video loop feature of Vine). Maybe Facebook will allow for a *gasp* 8 second clip?

Personally, I think Mark Zuckerberg is starting to feel the squeeze of Twitter and the massive number of people ditching Facebook to get their tweet on.

Last week, Hanson Dodge hosted their annual PR and Social Media Summit at Marquette University. It was a day-long event featuring presentation and keynote speeches from professionals across the country.

In 2011, I was fortunate enough to attend and actually speak on a panel on Social Media and its influence on the Arts & Entertainment. This year, I was able to sit back and relax and soak up some incredible insight from some heavy hitters.

I attended 4 presentations on Instagram, Social Media and the News, a presentation by Augie Ray, and a very interesting panel that talked about Social Media and its influence in the Craft Beer community. All in all there were some great topics discussed, and I can say that I learned a lot.

 

‘Dr. Gee Ekachai on Instagram

The first presentation I attended was a very informational section on Instagram by Dr. Gee Ekachai. She spoke on the importance of the hidden gem, Instagram, for brands to connect with fans. Many people like brands on Facebook or follow them on Twitter, however, Instagram gives a “face” to the brand. People can see products, events, as well as fan-generated content without having to sift through all the nonsense.

Instagram can also be used to bridge gaps between campaigns being carried out by a brand. For example, the Father Marquette account uses many different hashtags including #MUexplore created by Tim Cigelske, later adopted by Gee for one of her classes.

Using an account familiar across campus in collaboration with a single class on campus, the hashtag instantly exploded and many students were discovering beautiful new spots on campus.

 

Social Media’s Influence on the News and Media

This panel was very interesting as well. It dug deep into the ever-evolving media rooms now know as Earth. With the explosion of social media and the interconnectedness of the world (in real time), people can now help journalists create and expand on developing news stories. However, with the newly created direct lines with journalists comes a price. People now expect to interact and experience journalists’ personalities.

We all have an online presence, and this does not exclude those who deliver news to us. It also paints a better picture of who is actually presenting this news to us.This idea also helps to develop the collective brand of media outlets. Journalists are people as much as we are, and as Kathryn Janicek puts it, “I want my people to be able to have a beer with our audience.”

However, this direct line between audience and journalists can be a double-edged sword: If a journalist has to be continuously corrected on facts, or dubious stories are abound, it can be very detrimental not only to the journalist’s credibility, but that of the overall media outlet as well. The expanse of the Internet means that facts can, and should be, checked quickly and easily.

 

Augie Ray on Social Media Bubbles

In this presentation, Augie Ray tackled some great myths of social media. It tackled whether or not we should be overly personal on social media as well as if social media is truly a marketing medium.

In the beginning, social media was meant to be, well, a social medium, but as strategies and studies on social media develop, we are finding out that sometimes it’s not the best advice. Augie urges that our tone matches our objectives. You can’t act one way online and a completely different way offline.

As far as being a marketing medium, Augie argues that if consumers are in charge, social media inherently can’t be a marketing medium. He also argues that because audience trust in TV, magazine, and radio ads are down as much as 20%, in this day and age, consumer trust is becoming a very important currency.

However, in all reality, consumers are not footing the bill. Social media needs revenue so even if you don’t click ads, you still find marketing tactics in front of you. Then what is the big relationship? Augie believes that marketers and their audience mutually create value and build relationships. Money does have to be invested into target audiences, but trying to gain the value and engagement of likes/followers can end up being neutral, or even worse, detrimental. It doesn’t matter to have a bunch of fans and followers, but it does matter how those fans engage with your brand.

 

Social Media’s Influence on the Craft Beer Community

The final panel I attended was a very interesting look at how social media ahas helped the craft beer community evolve into what it is today. What surprised me is the behind-the-scenes grassroots-eqsue effort that has gone into growing and fostering the community. Through the use of social media, breweries have adapted packaging (use of hashtags, QR codes, etc.) as well as marketing tactics to get their specialty brews out there.

The panel included representatives from Goose Island, Milwaukee Brewing Co., and a craft beer critic. Many said the use of social media helps companies announce when/where new brews will be available as well as interacting with fans to see what is a hit and what is a miss.

Overall, this day-long event can celebrate another successful year. Unfortunately, I could not attend throughout the entire day, but I’m confident that the other presentations were on point as the ones I had attended. If you have the opportunity to attend this event in coming years, I highly suggest you do as it is a great and enlightening experience.

 

The following is a list of Twitter handles for the panelists/presenters I attended:

Dr. Gee Ekachai, Diederich College of Communication, Marquette University – @FvrythingPR

Sharif Durhams, Social Media Editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – @sdurhams

Kathryn Janicek, Executive Producer, NBC Chicago Morning Show – @kathrynjanicek

Andy Tarnoff, Co-Founder and Owner, OnMilwaukee.com – @AndyTarnoff

Herbert Lowe, Diederich College of Communication, Marquette University – @herbertlowe

Augie Ray, Director of Social Media, Prudential – @augieray

Mike Thiel, Marketing, Goose Island Beer Co. – @Mike_Thiel

Emma Pohl, Milwaukee Brewing Co. – @MBCemma

Brew City, Beer Blog for MilwaukeeMag.com – @InsideBrewCity

 

A weekend in Chicago turned into a technological epiphany. I deleted my Facebook, I didn’t tweet, I didn’t shoot a picture with Instagram, and all in all, the only people I kept in contact with were my parents via sparse texts (also a handful of emails related to work). And to be completely honest, it was awesomely refreshing.

Lately, I’ve been wondering where the limit is for social media. When do we stop? With the countless hours of YouTube videos posted each minute, all the active members on Facebook, and the millions of tweets sent out each day, how do we stay connected to who and what we want?

I am currently following 491 people on Twitter. Do I see what every one of them are saying? Not even close. It is almost impossible to check every followers’ account to keep up to date with everything they push out. Then there are the people who seem to have absolutely nothing to do all day judging by the amount of tweets they send out (32 tweets in 5 minutes? Tsk tsk, he-who-shall-not-be-named).

So again, where do we draw the line. Personally, social media has become more and more fascinating while also becoming more and more terrifying. Really, how do we keep up with everything that is going on? There are infinite amounts of “things” out there people are talking about, but there is literally not enough time ever to keep up with all of it.

And I know this all sounds fairly hypocritical seeing as I blog, tweet, and share pictures of my lunch on Instagram, but as of late, it’s all been winding down.

I think that social media has hit its plateau. We can analyze only so much, and we can use social media to benefit our brands and lives only so much. An artist at the GALORE festival in Copenhagen, Denmark challenges our reliance on all things web social in this time-lapse video that asks the question: “When is too much simply too much?”


Twitter Updates

  • @PhilBatzner @drewtoothpaste Ohhhhh my god. Most unexpected 2017. 3 days ago
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