Jarter Jargon

Posts Tagged ‘Facebook

As everyone knows, Instagram launched its new video feature. What followed was not surprising. Vine fanatics bashed it, techies discussed whether it was better than Vine, and people everywhere posted the obligatory “My first Instagram video!”

While some believed the new Instagram features “beat” Vine, others argue that the two platforms are incomparable. Personally, I agree with the latter. While it’s obvious Facebook realized the potential Vine unlocked, Instagram’s video capability is very different than Vine’s.

The allure of Vine for marketers and Vine-celebs is the stop motion effect. Instagram video has a much harder time capturing that. It also takes quite a bit of creativity to pull off an impressive Vine.

Conversely, Instagram video has a few things going its way. Instagram is already so well-liked, I personally think the new feature will be widely accepted and make its way into your regular app use easier than it was for Vine to break through.

While I see Vine-celebs sticking to their guns, I think Instagram video will be a staple for consistent users.

First we saw the rollout of Facebook hashtags. Now there are rumblings of a possible Vine-like feature to be added to Instagram.

While Facebook hashtags are a genius way of creating deeper conversations much like on Twitter, the announcement of the new Instagram feature just makes it seem as though Facebook realized how big of a hit Vine has become and wants in on the action.

Vine has become the new arena for viral sensations. 6 seconds might not seem too long, but some new creative personalities seem to have figured it out.

Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey was reportedly heartbroken when Facebook purchased Instagram in April 2012 for $1 billion in cash and stock. Looks like the joke is now on Facebook as they begin to emulate the booming Vine app feature.

Updates and developments should be interesting. Obviously, Twitter can’t own the ‘#’ symbol, but I find it interesting the use of the hashtag to create and track conversations is wide open for Facebook to swoop in and utilize (similarly, the 6-second video loop feature of Vine). Maybe Facebook will allow for a *gasp* 8 second clip?

Personally, I think Mark Zuckerberg is starting to feel the squeeze of Twitter and the massive number of people ditching Facebook to get their tweet on.

Screen shot 2013-04-11 at 8.23.29 AM

Facebook recently rolled out a new feature: adding emotions, things you’re watching, eating, reading, and listening to (among a few others) to your status post. It seems like a fun way to let people know how you’re doing or what you’re doing. It fosters conversations within your own community and connects you to others who could be watching/eating/drinking/listening to the same. But underneath, it serves a much larger purpose. As Josh Constine notes,

“Along with being fun for users, it could be a big help to advertisers, though Facebook tells me it’s not piping this data into its ad engine just yet. By selecting your current activity instead of merely writing it out, you structure data for Facebook. That could eventually help it to connect you with advertisers who want to reach people who frequently watch TV and movies, or listen to music, or eat at restaurants.”

If you listened to a certain song, ads for the artist’s new album could be targeted towards you. Or if you are the type to watch a lot of movies, Netflix could target ads towards you.

Facebook does a great job of mining information from you without you even knowing. Third party companies track your purchase habits. When you add a new friend, you are prompted with a question about whether or not you know that person outside of Facebook. You can set geo-tags on posts to let people (and Facebook) know where you are. These are just a few of the features that Facebook uses to learn as much about you as possible.

A little creepy, right?

A few months back, Facebook rolled out their Graph Search. It lets you search for people in a more specific (some say “unsettling”) way. You can search for people who like to cycle. You can look for people who like to cycle that live in your city. You can look for people who like to cycle that live in your city and are friends with your friends. You see where I’m going? It puts front and center just how much data we have committed to this social network.

With people freaking out about online privacy and security, it sure amazes me how openly they share information and how openly they allow Facebook to gather information. Although the latter, there isn’t really a way around it. The way Facebook structures itself makes it hard NOT to have your information mined out. Pages you like, people you friend, your interests, everything plays a role into how Facebook crawls across your profile and archives data. Although scary, it can be humorous (second link is now defunct).

So be careful about what you put on the internet. In Facebook’s case, every design mechanism plays a role.

When Facebook and Twitter completely exploded and changed the Internet scene, companies rushed online to make their presence within the socialsphere. They tried to accrue all the likes and followers they could, but at what cost?

As we’ve seen, it doesn’t matter how many likes/followers you have, but how many active and engaged likes/followers you have. Different social dashboards (i.e. SocialBro, Tweetdeck, BottleNose, etc.) can help you keep track of what’s going on, who’s doing what, and who’s talking about what. They can even give insight to your followers. SocialBro lets you know different ratio stats about followers (e.g. they have a higher ratio of followers-to-following/vice versa), and they can tell you about inactive/unengaged users that follow you. Facebook insights also does a pretty good job of digging deep into your ‘likes.’

But looking at the strategy that goes into a brand, some are too quick to get onto social streams. The idea is that, “If our competition is doing it, we should be too.” WRONG. The idea of a brand’s strategy is to look at what problems they are facing and how they can solve those problems. If Facebook and Twitter are solutions, develop a plan. If not, don’t jump head first into it just because your competition is using certain platforms.

Social media affords businesses with the opportunity to build their brand and gain customers more quickly, as well as having a greater and more personal impact than traditional branding methods.

But as with everything in business, there is a double-edged sword. The more quickly you can spread the positives about your business, the faster customers will come running. The same can happen if a dissatisfied customer uses social media to spread the word about their experience with your company, which can cause your customer base to dwindle.

Some might even say that social media has caused companies to remain more transparent and accountable to their customers because of the tool’s ability to be used for both positive and negative, both by company and by customer.

Just because Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and a hundred other social media tools are available for businesses to use, doesn’t mean that they are the best route for every business to take. Finding the tools that will work best for not only your business’s needs, but the work style of your team and the requirements of data backup, tracking and analytics will take time, but can mean saved time, money and frustration in the long run.

Adding social media to a brand management strategy may not simply be a matter of fitting it in between current marketing processes. In order to facilitate long-term success with social media brand management, it may also be necessary to take a look at the complete marketing and branding process to ensure that it contains the hierarchy and work flow to accommodate it.

Last week, Hanson Dodge hosted their annual PR and Social Media Summit at Marquette University. It was a day-long event featuring presentation and keynote speeches from professionals across the country.

In 2011, I was fortunate enough to attend and actually speak on a panel on Social Media and its influence on the Arts & Entertainment. This year, I was able to sit back and relax and soak up some incredible insight from some heavy hitters.

I attended 4 presentations on Instagram, Social Media and the News, a presentation by Augie Ray, and a very interesting panel that talked about Social Media and its influence in the Craft Beer community. All in all there were some great topics discussed, and I can say that I learned a lot.

 

‘Dr. Gee Ekachai on Instagram

The first presentation I attended was a very informational section on Instagram by Dr. Gee Ekachai. She spoke on the importance of the hidden gem, Instagram, for brands to connect with fans. Many people like brands on Facebook or follow them on Twitter, however, Instagram gives a “face” to the brand. People can see products, events, as well as fan-generated content without having to sift through all the nonsense.

Instagram can also be used to bridge gaps between campaigns being carried out by a brand. For example, the Father Marquette account uses many different hashtags including #MUexplore created by Tim Cigelske, later adopted by Gee for one of her classes.

Using an account familiar across campus in collaboration with a single class on campus, the hashtag instantly exploded and many students were discovering beautiful new spots on campus.

 

Social Media’s Influence on the News and Media

This panel was very interesting as well. It dug deep into the ever-evolving media rooms now know as Earth. With the explosion of social media and the interconnectedness of the world (in real time), people can now help journalists create and expand on developing news stories. However, with the newly created direct lines with journalists comes a price. People now expect to interact and experience journalists’ personalities.

We all have an online presence, and this does not exclude those who deliver news to us. It also paints a better picture of who is actually presenting this news to us.This idea also helps to develop the collective brand of media outlets. Journalists are people as much as we are, and as Kathryn Janicek puts it, “I want my people to be able to have a beer with our audience.”

However, this direct line between audience and journalists can be a double-edged sword: If a journalist has to be continuously corrected on facts, or dubious stories are abound, it can be very detrimental not only to the journalist’s credibility, but that of the overall media outlet as well. The expanse of the Internet means that facts can, and should be, checked quickly and easily.

 

Augie Ray on Social Media Bubbles

In this presentation, Augie Ray tackled some great myths of social media. It tackled whether or not we should be overly personal on social media as well as if social media is truly a marketing medium.

In the beginning, social media was meant to be, well, a social medium, but as strategies and studies on social media develop, we are finding out that sometimes it’s not the best advice. Augie urges that our tone matches our objectives. You can’t act one way online and a completely different way offline.

As far as being a marketing medium, Augie argues that if consumers are in charge, social media inherently can’t be a marketing medium. He also argues that because audience trust in TV, magazine, and radio ads are down as much as 20%, in this day and age, consumer trust is becoming a very important currency.

However, in all reality, consumers are not footing the bill. Social media needs revenue so even if you don’t click ads, you still find marketing tactics in front of you. Then what is the big relationship? Augie believes that marketers and their audience mutually create value and build relationships. Money does have to be invested into target audiences, but trying to gain the value and engagement of likes/followers can end up being neutral, or even worse, detrimental. It doesn’t matter to have a bunch of fans and followers, but it does matter how those fans engage with your brand.

 

Social Media’s Influence on the Craft Beer Community

The final panel I attended was a very interesting look at how social media ahas helped the craft beer community evolve into what it is today. What surprised me is the behind-the-scenes grassroots-eqsue effort that has gone into growing and fostering the community. Through the use of social media, breweries have adapted packaging (use of hashtags, QR codes, etc.) as well as marketing tactics to get their specialty brews out there.

The panel included representatives from Goose Island, Milwaukee Brewing Co., and a craft beer critic. Many said the use of social media helps companies announce when/where new brews will be available as well as interacting with fans to see what is a hit and what is a miss.

Overall, this day-long event can celebrate another successful year. Unfortunately, I could not attend throughout the entire day, but I’m confident that the other presentations were on point as the ones I had attended. If you have the opportunity to attend this event in coming years, I highly suggest you do as it is a great and enlightening experience.

 

The following is a list of Twitter handles for the panelists/presenters I attended:

Dr. Gee Ekachai, Diederich College of Communication, Marquette University – @FvrythingPR

Sharif Durhams, Social Media Editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – @sdurhams

Kathryn Janicek, Executive Producer, NBC Chicago Morning Show – @kathrynjanicek

Andy Tarnoff, Co-Founder and Owner, OnMilwaukee.com – @AndyTarnoff

Herbert Lowe, Diederich College of Communication, Marquette University – @herbertlowe

Augie Ray, Director of Social Media, Prudential – @augieray

Mike Thiel, Marketing, Goose Island Beer Co. – @Mike_Thiel

Emma Pohl, Milwaukee Brewing Co. – @MBCemma

Brew City, Beer Blog for MilwaukeeMag.com – @InsideBrewCity

 

Tonight is the night of the Presidential debate. It’s been a long road for both candidates, and while I particularly don’t follow politics (although I probably should), what is interesting to me is all the nit-picky discrepancies that come out during the election time.

Everyone picks sides, draws a line in the sand, and marks their territory. Politics can be a pretty rough topic to bring up among most crowds although, in this day and age, the debate floor won’t be the only place where each candidate’s campaigns square off. As with each party’s conventions and speeches by numerous people, social media activity spikes dramatically, and I won’t be surprised when the numbers for tonight’s event are calculated.

Interestingly enough, again, are the smallest details that people pull up and make into a big deal. According to Mashable, Obama has four times more LinkedIn followers than Romney, about 42,000 to about 10,000, but wait, there’s more: Obama’s 29 million fans on Facebook compared to Romney’s 8 million, as well as Obama’s 20.4 million Twitter followers compared to Romney’s 1.2 million. People are making quite a deal out of these stats, but Obama has been in the limelight much longer than Romney has so it’s not surprising.

But who the hell cares. Although a simple Google search of “Twitter” turns up some pretty interesting results.

Again, I don’t follow politics, but the pissing contest that amasses during election time is quite honestly hilarious. The debate will be interesting to watch and follow online, though. With such a connected nation (and planet for that matter), the conversation will be, well, epic. Technology has created a real-time debate floor for millions and millions of people. Sure it might be hard to sift through the clutter and shit talking within the online universe, but in all actuality, I’m confident the debate will pump out some very impressive numbers.

So throw your hat in the ring, or sit back and watch. Follow the official #debate hashtag tonight on Twitter.

Last month, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg mentioned in an interview that the social media giant was looking to develop a search engine.

Zuckerberg believes that, with the use of internet bots, he can create a search engine unlike Google (or its estranged second cousin twice removed on its mother’s father’s aunt’s side, Bing). To emulate Google’s success, Facebook would have to invest a hearty amount, and their data warehouses are a different kind of data than that found through Google searches.

Facebook users talk about movies, music, products and vacations. Essentially, the Facebook search engine could simply become a massive consumer database. The company’s social scientists are hunting for insights about human behavior. What they find could give Facebook new ways to cash in on our data—and remake our view of society.

The problem with this is obviously security and privacy. Facebook has been slapped on the wrist quite a few times for privacy issues, but this intense data mining will definitely have to be scrutinized. Now of course, President Obama’s administration unveiled it’s “Privacy Bill of Rights” which calls for giving people more control over what companies do with personal information. Some even believe that Facebook, as the world’s largest social media site, should be subjected to specific consumer protection regulations.

While the world of commerce and information gathering continues to expand rapidly, we need to take a look at what is acceptable and not acceptable information gathered on people. But where do we draw the line on what is acceptable? Age? Gender? These are basic information, but to some it’s still too much. Salary? Spending habits? It’s a matter of how we feel individually that defines what goes too far.

Some people are smart about it while others aren’t. What gets posted online is going to be there forever. We need to be careful, just as much as Facebook does, as to what information we give out, although Facebook does a good job of burying privacy settings deeper and deeper with each new reformatting.


Twitter Updates