Jarter Jargon

Archive for the ‘Advertising’ Category

As everyone knows, Instagram launched its new video feature. What followed was not surprising. Vine fanatics bashed it, techies discussed whether it was better than Vine, and people everywhere posted the obligatory “My first Instagram video!”

While some believed the new Instagram features “beat” Vine, others argue that the two platforms are incomparable. Personally, I agree with the latter. While it’s obvious Facebook realized the potential Vine unlocked, Instagram’s video capability is very different than Vine’s.

The allure of Vine for marketers and Vine-celebs is the stop motion effect. Instagram video has a much harder time capturing that. It also takes quite a bit of creativity to pull off an impressive Vine.

Conversely, Instagram video has a few things going its way. Instagram is already so well-liked, I personally think the new feature will be widely accepted and make its way into your regular app use easier than it was for Vine to break through.

While I see Vine-celebs sticking to their guns, I think Instagram video will be a staple for consistent users.

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Facebook recently rolled out a new feature: adding emotions, things you’re watching, eating, reading, and listening to (among a few others) to your status post. It seems like a fun way to let people know how you’re doing or what you’re doing. It fosters conversations within your own community and connects you to others who could be watching/eating/drinking/listening to the same. But underneath, it serves a much larger purpose. As Josh Constine notes,

“Along with being fun for users, it could be a big help to advertisers, though Facebook tells me it’s not piping this data into its ad engine just yet. By selecting your current activity instead of merely writing it out, you structure data for Facebook. That could eventually help it to connect you with advertisers who want to reach people who frequently watch TV and movies, or listen to music, or eat at restaurants.”

If you listened to a certain song, ads for the artist’s new album could be targeted towards you. Or if you are the type to watch a lot of movies, Netflix could target ads towards you.

Facebook does a great job of mining information from you without you even knowing. Third party companies track your purchase habits. When you add a new friend, you are prompted with a question about whether or not you know that person outside of Facebook. You can set geo-tags on posts to let people (and Facebook) know where you are. These are just a few of the features that Facebook uses to learn as much about you as possible.

A little creepy, right?

A few months back, Facebook rolled out their Graph Search. It lets you search for people in a more specific (some say “unsettling”) way. You can search for people who like to cycle. You can look for people who like to cycle that live in your city. You can look for people who like to cycle that live in your city and are friends with your friends. You see where I’m going? It puts front and center just how much data we have committed to this social network.

With people freaking out about online privacy and security, it sure amazes me how openly they share information and how openly they allow Facebook to gather information. Although the latter, there isn’t really a way around it. The way Facebook structures itself makes it hard NOT to have your information mined out. Pages you like, people you friend, your interests, everything plays a role into how Facebook crawls across your profile and archives data. Although scary, it can be humorous (second link is now defunct).

So be careful about what you put on the internet. In Facebook’s case, every design mechanism plays a role.

It seems lately that social media marketing is slowly reaching a plateau, at least in my opinion. While there are some leaps and bounds that have been made, we just keep having roundabout discussions about what social media really can do. “No one knows the true power of social media marketing. There’s something there but we can’t put our finger on it.” “Engagement is key.” “Listen to your audience.” We live in a day and age where interconnectivity is thriving and growing rapidly. Brands pay incredible amounts of money to pump out every last drop of their social channels.

But how can we move past survival in this incredibly connected world?

As of late, I feel inspired and motivated to learn as much as I possibly can because social media is, in fact, a learning experience. We all make mistakes in our career. It’s inevitable, however we need to take those mistakes and turn it into something to not only benefit ourselves but the social community as a whole.

I recently read a blog post from 7Summits about how it doesn’t matter what tools you have to analyze and monitor and pour over what people are saying about your brand. News flash: everyone has access to the same tools. It’s how you take that information and apply it to create value for your business. We need to move past survival. One key role in doing so is also moving past ignorance.

This brings me back to the position I am in now. I want to learn. Social media is fascinating because there truly is a wealth of knowledge and power to be discovered. We are barely scratching the surface, but it also seems people are set in their ways: see how people interact with your brand’s channels, analyze sentiment, analyze share of voice, track some other KPIs. Again, there is progress being made, but what can we do to dive deep into the data we are gathering and really create value for our companies? We need to step back and ask ourselves, “Why?”

Asking “Why” is the foundation for any discovery. It is also the beginning of a cycle. When we ask ourselves this simple question, it leads to creative thinking which in turn leads us to solving problems. Through this process we continue to grasp new concepts. We can then ask ourselves “Why?” about these discoveries, and it starts the cycle again. Like I said, social media marketing is a learning experience. We will make mistakes, it’s a given. But we need to keep learning, keep asking ourselves, “Why?”

While we all are monitoring social channels for mentions, follows, likes, unlikes, retweets, and a whole list of other things to worry about, many brands are overlooking a more simple idea: “purchase intent indicators.”

We need to take a look at the broad audience. Sure we track hashtags and certain groups, but what about the small-time, broad-range conversations that go on under our radar? A perfect example is Jason Fall’s experiment one day in Louisville. He tweeted:

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These are the kinds of tweets people send out in a heartbeat looking for general feedback. To Jason’s surprise, he received a tweet from a bourbon joint in a Marriott hotel on the city’s east side.

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A simple suggestion that grew from some pretty smart monitoring, but it’s something small that should still be considered by brands everywhere. Just because people aren’t directly mentioning your brand specifically doesn’t mean that it’s out of your realm.

Ever since the explosion of social media marketing, there has been a push to figure out how to track online experiences and how they convert to actual consumer action.

The prob­lem for most marketers is that they have a hard time see­ing what influ­ence the relation­ships they have nur­tured on social net­works have on cus­tomer behav­ior.  Where exactly does it make an impact? The “soft metrics” of social marketing—Likes, com­ments and retweets—don’t directly point to how social impacts pur­chase deci­sions along the customer journey. So instead of strate­giz­ing based on busi­ness data and results, mar­keters are rely­ing on their intuition that social media impacts their business.

We have seen a handful of platforms emerge to help social media metric strategy grow from adolescence into a mature digital marketing channel. Hootsuite and Radian 6 are some of the heavy hitters, but it still seems like true results of social media’s influence is hard to come by.

Apparently until now.

Early September, Adobe announced the release of Adobe Social which reportedly “can help you manage it all, from integrating social media into your overall digital marketing plan to getting critical insights and creating new content instantaneously. Most important, Adobe Social helps you turn your social efforts into measurable business results.”

Let’s be honest, no Exec is going to move some big money unless they get results. So how do you get those results? Adobe Social is a social media management platform combining listening, engagement, and analytics tools in one package. enables brands to determine whether or not social activity is having a true business impact. It features a publishing tool to easily publish to multiple networks.

Adobe Social also allows you to create social content and applications — which can currently be published to Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ — using a drag-and-drop interface. The service comes with audience targeting capabilities, plus you can look at the data to see how effective the ads and content are, and adjust accordingly.

The other big selling point is the integration with other products in Adobe’s Digital Marketing Suite — as Adobe puts it, it’s breaking social advertising out of its silo. On the publishing side, marketers aren’t just creating and measuring social marketing campaigns, they can also use Adobe Test & Target to deliver personalized messages to visitors when they come to your website after clicking on a social ad. It also integrates with Adobe Discover, so marketers can divide their social audience into segments, and seeing which types of users (i.e., visitors who spend 1-5 minutes on the site versus visitors who spend more than 5 minutes) drive the most revenue. And it integrates Adobe Insight to show how social leads to in-store traffic.

The sheer scale of word-of-mouth that can be accomplished on social media can become a powerful boost or tragic descent for any company and is best managed if a company€™s social marketers are in lock-step,€ Brad Rencher, senior vice president and general manager, Digital Marketing Business, Adobe, said in a statement. €œAdobe Social brings to social marketing the control and accountability expected across other digital channels. The ultimate aim is to help social media as a marketing channel mature and prove its worth alongside other digital marketing investments.€

It will be interesting to see how Adobe Social plays out and what changes in online marketing will occur as a result.

Last week, Hanson Dodge hosted their annual PR and Social Media Summit at Marquette University. It was a day-long event featuring presentation and keynote speeches from professionals across the country.

In 2011, I was fortunate enough to attend and actually speak on a panel on Social Media and its influence on the Arts & Entertainment. This year, I was able to sit back and relax and soak up some incredible insight from some heavy hitters.

I attended 4 presentations on Instagram, Social Media and the News, a presentation by Augie Ray, and a very interesting panel that talked about Social Media and its influence in the Craft Beer community. All in all there were some great topics discussed, and I can say that I learned a lot.

 

‘Dr. Gee Ekachai on Instagram

The first presentation I attended was a very informational section on Instagram by Dr. Gee Ekachai. She spoke on the importance of the hidden gem, Instagram, for brands to connect with fans. Many people like brands on Facebook or follow them on Twitter, however, Instagram gives a “face” to the brand. People can see products, events, as well as fan-generated content without having to sift through all the nonsense.

Instagram can also be used to bridge gaps between campaigns being carried out by a brand. For example, the Father Marquette account uses many different hashtags including #MUexplore created by Tim Cigelske, later adopted by Gee for one of her classes.

Using an account familiar across campus in collaboration with a single class on campus, the hashtag instantly exploded and many students were discovering beautiful new spots on campus.

 

Social Media’s Influence on the News and Media

This panel was very interesting as well. It dug deep into the ever-evolving media rooms now know as Earth. With the explosion of social media and the interconnectedness of the world (in real time), people can now help journalists create and expand on developing news stories. However, with the newly created direct lines with journalists comes a price. People now expect to interact and experience journalists’ personalities.

We all have an online presence, and this does not exclude those who deliver news to us. It also paints a better picture of who is actually presenting this news to us.This idea also helps to develop the collective brand of media outlets. Journalists are people as much as we are, and as Kathryn Janicek puts it, “I want my people to be able to have a beer with our audience.”

However, this direct line between audience and journalists can be a double-edged sword: If a journalist has to be continuously corrected on facts, or dubious stories are abound, it can be very detrimental not only to the journalist’s credibility, but that of the overall media outlet as well. The expanse of the Internet means that facts can, and should be, checked quickly and easily.

 

Augie Ray on Social Media Bubbles

In this presentation, Augie Ray tackled some great myths of social media. It tackled whether or not we should be overly personal on social media as well as if social media is truly a marketing medium.

In the beginning, social media was meant to be, well, a social medium, but as strategies and studies on social media develop, we are finding out that sometimes it’s not the best advice. Augie urges that our tone matches our objectives. You can’t act one way online and a completely different way offline.

As far as being a marketing medium, Augie argues that if consumers are in charge, social media inherently can’t be a marketing medium. He also argues that because audience trust in TV, magazine, and radio ads are down as much as 20%, in this day and age, consumer trust is becoming a very important currency.

However, in all reality, consumers are not footing the bill. Social media needs revenue so even if you don’t click ads, you still find marketing tactics in front of you. Then what is the big relationship? Augie believes that marketers and their audience mutually create value and build relationships. Money does have to be invested into target audiences, but trying to gain the value and engagement of likes/followers can end up being neutral, or even worse, detrimental. It doesn’t matter to have a bunch of fans and followers, but it does matter how those fans engage with your brand.

 

Social Media’s Influence on the Craft Beer Community

The final panel I attended was a very interesting look at how social media ahas helped the craft beer community evolve into what it is today. What surprised me is the behind-the-scenes grassroots-eqsue effort that has gone into growing and fostering the community. Through the use of social media, breweries have adapted packaging (use of hashtags, QR codes, etc.) as well as marketing tactics to get their specialty brews out there.

The panel included representatives from Goose Island, Milwaukee Brewing Co., and a craft beer critic. Many said the use of social media helps companies announce when/where new brews will be available as well as interacting with fans to see what is a hit and what is a miss.

Overall, this day-long event can celebrate another successful year. Unfortunately, I could not attend throughout the entire day, but I’m confident that the other presentations were on point as the ones I had attended. If you have the opportunity to attend this event in coming years, I highly suggest you do as it is a great and enlightening experience.

 

The following is a list of Twitter handles for the panelists/presenters I attended:

Dr. Gee Ekachai, Diederich College of Communication, Marquette University – @FvrythingPR

Sharif Durhams, Social Media Editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – @sdurhams

Kathryn Janicek, Executive Producer, NBC Chicago Morning Show – @kathrynjanicek

Andy Tarnoff, Co-Founder and Owner, OnMilwaukee.com – @AndyTarnoff

Herbert Lowe, Diederich College of Communication, Marquette University – @herbertlowe

Augie Ray, Director of Social Media, Prudential – @augieray

Mike Thiel, Marketing, Goose Island Beer Co. – @Mike_Thiel

Emma Pohl, Milwaukee Brewing Co. – @MBCemma

Brew City, Beer Blog for MilwaukeeMag.com – @InsideBrewCity

 

I’m sure by now you have heard the song “Gangnam Style” by South Korean pop sensation Psy.

If not, get out from under your rock.

Before we go any further, let me say that I have no idea what Psy is saying in “Gangnam Style,” but I do know that Gangnam-gu is one of the 25 gu (local government districts) which make up the city of Seoul, South Korea. It is one of the most affluent areas of Seoul and is located in the southeast of the city.

It’s also the newest craze to hit the internet. It’s catchy, it’s danceable, and the dance that accompanies it is easiest for the whitest, most inept dancers on the planet. I can’t dance to save my life, but I surely can cut the hell out of a rug dancing like I’m riding a horse. I can safely say I’ve never lassoed harder in my entire life. Maybe I can start up my rodeo career. Either way, how does a song garner 172,000,000 views in just two months? How does any video reach viral fame?

Viral marketing is a surefire way to get your message out to a hefty number of viewers (as seen by the hundreds of millions of views on many viral videos) in a very short amount of time.

According to marketing professors Andreas Kaplan and Michael Haenlein,[9] to make viral marketing work, three basic criteria must be met, i.e., giving the right message to the right messengers in the right environment:

  • Messenger: Three specific types of messengers are required to ensure the transformation of an ordinary message into a viral one: market mavens, social hubs, and salespeople. Market mavens are individuals who are continuously ‘on the pulse’ of things (information specialists); they are usually among the first to get exposed to the message and who transmit it to their immediate social network. Social hubs are people with an exceptionally large number of social connections; they often know hundreds of different people and have the ability to serve as connectors or bridges between different subcultures. Salespeople might be needed who receive the message from the market maven, amplify it by making it more relevant and persuasive, and then transmit it to the social hub for further distribution. Market mavens may not be particularly convincing in transmitting the information.
  • Message: Only messages that are both memorable and sufficiently interesting to be passed on to others have the potential to spur a viral marketing phenomenon. Making a message more memorable and interesting or simply more infectious, is often not a matter of major changes but minor adjustments.
  • Environment: The environment is crucial in the rise of successful viral marketing – small changes in the environment lead to huge results, and people are much more sensitive to environment. The timing and context of the campaign launch must be right.

With the ever-expanding social media market, it is prime real estate for marketers to push their message to millions of people worldwide in real time. It doesn’t have to be a hit song. It doesn’t have to be a video of your cute cat. It can be whatever you want the message to be, but without the right message, in the right channel, getting to the right people, well, you’re just as lost as I am with Psy’s lyrics.

So get out there, put on your rodeo dancing shoes, and put the world’s market to use. In the mean time, brush up on your galloping and lassoing skills.


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