Jarter Jargon

Archive for November 2012

Picture your dream job. Are you currently working that dream job?

As graduation draws ever closer and my search of a job continues grinding along, I’ve really had to take the time to stop and think about my future. I know I’ve said this before, but I also know that I most likely won’t graduate into my dream job. However, it might not be all that bad.

What is life? I’m not going to copy and paste some Webster definition (I mean, come one, that’s well overplayed), but I will tell you that it’s a big ball of experiences. That’s it! Everything we do, everyone we interact with shapes us into who we are today. Right now. Classes, weekends, new friends, old friends, lost friends, internships, they’re all experiences. So instead of complaining about your job or your long day, just remember that it’s an experience, and it’s happening for a reason.

Everyone says love what you do, do what you love. I guess that’s a pretty good mantra, but I think “Make a life, not a living” seems to be more fitting for me right now. Of course we work to provide for ourselves and our family, but what good is it if you don’t make anything out of what you do?

Some people are destined for greatness. Why not pursue greatness? We all have the capability to do the best we can at what we are best at, so why not do it? I can personally say that my own decisions and interactions in life have led me to, well, a great life thus far. If you want something, you have to go after it. I want to be great. I will do everything I can to be so.

So while I plan on making a living to keep a roof over my head, clothes on my back, and food on the table, I also plan on making a life, and I plan on doing my very best to make the most out of that life.

Advertisements

Ever since the explosion of social media marketing, there has been a push to figure out how to track online experiences and how they convert to actual consumer action.

The prob­lem for most marketers is that they have a hard time see­ing what influ­ence the relation­ships they have nur­tured on social net­works have on cus­tomer behav­ior.  Where exactly does it make an impact? The “soft metrics” of social marketing—Likes, com­ments and retweets—don’t directly point to how social impacts pur­chase deci­sions along the customer journey. So instead of strate­giz­ing based on busi­ness data and results, mar­keters are rely­ing on their intuition that social media impacts their business.

We have seen a handful of platforms emerge to help social media metric strategy grow from adolescence into a mature digital marketing channel. Hootsuite and Radian 6 are some of the heavy hitters, but it still seems like true results of social media’s influence is hard to come by.

Apparently until now.

Early September, Adobe announced the release of Adobe Social which reportedly “can help you manage it all, from integrating social media into your overall digital marketing plan to getting critical insights and creating new content instantaneously. Most important, Adobe Social helps you turn your social efforts into measurable business results.”

Let’s be honest, no Exec is going to move some big money unless they get results. So how do you get those results? Adobe Social is a social media management platform combining listening, engagement, and analytics tools in one package. enables brands to determine whether or not social activity is having a true business impact. It features a publishing tool to easily publish to multiple networks.

Adobe Social also allows you to create social content and applications — which can currently be published to Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ — using a drag-and-drop interface. The service comes with audience targeting capabilities, plus you can look at the data to see how effective the ads and content are, and adjust accordingly.

The other big selling point is the integration with other products in Adobe’s Digital Marketing Suite — as Adobe puts it, it’s breaking social advertising out of its silo. On the publishing side, marketers aren’t just creating and measuring social marketing campaigns, they can also use Adobe Test & Target to deliver personalized messages to visitors when they come to your website after clicking on a social ad. It also integrates with Adobe Discover, so marketers can divide their social audience into segments, and seeing which types of users (i.e., visitors who spend 1-5 minutes on the site versus visitors who spend more than 5 minutes) drive the most revenue. And it integrates Adobe Insight to show how social leads to in-store traffic.

The sheer scale of word-of-mouth that can be accomplished on social media can become a powerful boost or tragic descent for any company and is best managed if a company€™s social marketers are in lock-step,€ Brad Rencher, senior vice president and general manager, Digital Marketing Business, Adobe, said in a statement. €œAdobe Social brings to social marketing the control and accountability expected across other digital channels. The ultimate aim is to help social media as a marketing channel mature and prove its worth alongside other digital marketing investments.€

It will be interesting to see how Adobe Social plays out and what changes in online marketing will occur as a result.

When Facebook and Twitter completely exploded and changed the Internet scene, companies rushed online to make their presence within the socialsphere. They tried to accrue all the likes and followers they could, but at what cost?

As we’ve seen, it doesn’t matter how many likes/followers you have, but how many active and engaged likes/followers you have. Different social dashboards (i.e. SocialBro, Tweetdeck, BottleNose, etc.) can help you keep track of what’s going on, who’s doing what, and who’s talking about what. They can even give insight to your followers. SocialBro lets you know different ratio stats about followers (e.g. they have a higher ratio of followers-to-following/vice versa), and they can tell you about inactive/unengaged users that follow you. Facebook insights also does a pretty good job of digging deep into your ‘likes.’

But looking at the strategy that goes into a brand, some are too quick to get onto social streams. The idea is that, “If our competition is doing it, we should be too.” WRONG. The idea of a brand’s strategy is to look at what problems they are facing and how they can solve those problems. If Facebook and Twitter are solutions, develop a plan. If not, don’t jump head first into it just because your competition is using certain platforms.

Social media affords businesses with the opportunity to build their brand and gain customers more quickly, as well as having a greater and more personal impact than traditional branding methods.

But as with everything in business, there is a double-edged sword. The more quickly you can spread the positives about your business, the faster customers will come running. The same can happen if a dissatisfied customer uses social media to spread the word about their experience with your company, which can cause your customer base to dwindle.

Some might even say that social media has caused companies to remain more transparent and accountable to their customers because of the tool’s ability to be used for both positive and negative, both by company and by customer.

Just because Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and a hundred other social media tools are available for businesses to use, doesn’t mean that they are the best route for every business to take. Finding the tools that will work best for not only your business’s needs, but the work style of your team and the requirements of data backup, tracking and analytics will take time, but can mean saved time, money and frustration in the long run.

Adding social media to a brand management strategy may not simply be a matter of fitting it in between current marketing processes. In order to facilitate long-term success with social media brand management, it may also be necessary to take a look at the complete marketing and branding process to ensure that it contains the hierarchy and work flow to accommodate it.